Creating An Awesome Business Card

Updated: Feb 28

Business cards are still important marketing tools, particularly if you operate a small business. They're tiny enough to cart around and give out to people you meet at networking events. A business card's size also makes it easy for prospects and clients to tuck it into their wallet, desk drawer, or other places so they can locate it - and your company - when they need it.


That's why it's crucial to design a business card that will make you appear professional, increase customer confidence, and set your small business apart from the competition. But, before you go around handing out business cards to anyone you meet, think about what makes a good business card. How can you make it stand out and, as a result, attract more customers?


The answer is to think about what you're going to do and how you're going to show it. 

I have compiled a list of 10 important tips for designing a business card that best reflects you and your company! 

Are you ready to begin? This is how you make a business card:


  • Choose a prototype that represents the personality of your business.

  • Choose the appropriate typeface.

  • Choose a size and form that you like.

  • Organize the knowledge you have.

  • Consider the term "dual-purpose."

  • Make the most of your logo.

  • Allow for some breathing space.

  • Anything unique should be included.

  • Have a call to action in your message.


What's your Industry?

A subdued card is typically the best form of business card for financial services, physicians, lawyers, and other “coat and tie” occupations. However, this is not the case for all.


If you work in the creative industry, a business card that showcases your design skills acts as both an advertisement and a small portfolio of your work. Consider putting a picture of yourself on your card if you are your company or if prospects are more likely to recall your face than your company name.


The first law of innovation is that less is always better. On your card, be careful not to overdesign it or have too many elements or lines of text.


Business Card Design in Ireland

Choose your Font

If you've been using a particular font on your website or other marketing materials, incorporate it into your business card. The font you choose should be representative of your business.

It should also be simple to read. All of your text should be at least 8 points, but more relevant details (such as your name or company name) may be printed in a larger font, with a different typeface, or in bold.


Size is Important

The text size and amount of details you can put on your business card are influenced by the size and orientation of the card...and it also makes a statement about your brand. Are you a traditional, no-frills business or a daring nonconformist?


Most business cards are rectangular and horizontally spread out, around the size of a credit card. This format is well-known, so it's a safe bet, but if you want to stand out, try a square shape, rounded corners, or vertical orientation.


Put your Data in Order

Customers should be able to contact you, find you online, and find your shop or office using the details on your business card. Add your company name, phone number, website, email address, and social media handles to your resume, in addition to your name and job description. Be sure to include all of this information on your business card so that customers can reach you in the manner that suits them best.


Consider how the details are set out as you're filling out your business card template. Each piece of information can stand out but still flow well with the others.

For a good visual flow in a business card design, start with the logo, then the name, and then move on to secondary details like email addresses and phone numbers.


Think Outside the Box

Make your small business's business card work twice as hard for you. Use the backside for appointment reminders, loyalty stamps, or as a blank canvas to display information about your business. 


Turning your business card into a magnet is another way to make it last. This method is especially effective for businesses that provide recurring services such as gardening, hairdressing, car services, restaurants, and other similar services. Customers can post them on their fridges so that they can quickly access your contact details.


The possibilities for repurposing your business card are infinite, and they will help your card travel faster, last longer, and make a bigger impression.


Make the most of your Logo

Your business card is more than just a piece of paper with your contact details on it; it's a reflection of you and your company. Until you start designing new business cards, you should think about two important design elements: your finalised logo and your brand colours. These are the most crucial aspects of visual branding, and they will have an effect on other aspects of the card design process.


A business card is *all* about the logo, so try devoting one side of your card to it. As a visual representation of your business, it needs to be shown in a prominent location where potential customers can see it right away


White Space is Critical

If there are so many elements on the card, they will all fight for the reader's attention, and nothing will stand out. (Don't forget to use both sides of the card!) White space is easier on the eyes and can help draw attention to the most important information in a design.


Plus, before you hand out your card to someone, you may want to add a note—leaving a little space allows you to jot down your latest phone extension or give potential customers the name of a colleague.


As the saying goes "less is more", the fewer elements you have, the more effective each will have so think about how you can clear the clutter and leave a lasting impression.


The Finishing Touch

Special finishes will go a long way in leaving a lasting impression on potential buyers, partners, and clients.


Adding an unusual design feature or unique print treatment to your card is a simple way to make it stand out. Foil highlights add a touch of class, while embossed gloss produces a lifted, glossy coating that gives your cards a 3D feel that's hard to forget.


Another way to make your business card stand out is to use paper stock. Extra-thick paper adds a luxurious touch right away, while recycled craft paper has an organic feel to it.


Make sure these extras are suitable for your brand—a shimmery foil accent on your business card may feel out of place if you work in a less glamorous sector.


Call to Action

A call to action (CTA) isn't needed on business cards, but it can inspire potential clients to take the next step. Build an opportunity around your company to attract clients, whether it's a promotional deal, a helpful tip, or a discount code.


As part of your call to action, consider using a QR code. Adding a QR code to your business card is a perfect one-click way to take people to your website or to give them a special deal. We recommend printing the code on the back of your business card, where it will be easy to scan and won't compete with your logo on the front.


Double Check It

Is there anything more frustrating than discovering a mistake on a freshly printed box of business cards (or menus, or flyers)? Make sure to check all digits have been added to the phone number and there are no typos. Then ask a colleague to double-check your business card for spelling errors before you complete your order. 


Need Help?

If you need any help in the design of your business card, Design Gaff can assist you in the design. A business card is required if you are a startup or a well-established organization. A well-designed, high-quality card can reveal a lot about your business, communicate your professionalism, and convey your overall brand message in an instant.

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